10 May 2008

invited guest: JH Engström (Shelter, part II)

Earlier this week JH Engströms book Shelter (Härbärge in Swedish) was presented on the F blog. As a comment to the pictures Christofer, another F-blog author, said:

"So close and so very very strong! Photographs that really gets under your skin, and like a tattoo will stay there a lifetime."

I totally agree as I can't stop thinking about some of the pictures. Now I am happy to present eight other photographs from Engströms book Shelter, about homeless woman in Stockholm.









Please also look at the earlier posts about Engström and his work on the F blog (here or here) or visit his homepage.
Invited by Fredrik Skott

10 comments:

Jan Bernhardtz said...

I feel so sad when looking at these images. Really strong photos.

Anonymous said...

Strong, amazing portraits !!!

Tatiana

beatriz said...

the most amazing photographs that I've seen in my life. The work is without pity, but with an unblinking gaze at women who have survived and who have knowledge of life that nobody really wants to have.

Anonymous said...

amazing!

ulf said...

when I look at the pictures I think; this is what photography is all about
Strong, concentrated work with a lot of commitment by the photographer

jeanne said...

These are wonderful. Emotional and spiritual perfection are so much more powerful & essential than the technical perfection that is being taught.

Thank you for these photographs!

Anonymous said...

JH, thank you for sharing these strong images.
- f.

Anonymous said...

This is excellent! The presence and the narrative...

M Jenemark

ndiginiz said...

Tena koe ehoa
It's a marvelous series of portraits, environmental and social. I like the way the portraits seem nondescript as if to allow the viewer to form their own characterizations of the subjects. In essence it's a converse action ad reaction of how we as photographers would otherwise approach portraiture photography. Therein lies the dynamism of the series for me.

Christofer said...

-Oh, I love the uppermost one, it holds such a mixture of beauty, vulnerbility and sadness.